What is the Cost of LTC

Long Term Care Policies Will Soon Cost More For Women

Long Term Care Policies Will Soon Cost More For Women

The gender gap is about to get a little wider as the formerly egalitarian Long Term Care insurance market starts charging higher prices for women.

While life insurance has long been priced by sex, companies that provide Long Term care insurance (LTCI), mainly used to cover healthcare expenses in old age or for severe illness, have long avoided it. But for the first time this year, they will introduce gender-based pricing, starting with policies from Genworth Financial, Inc. the nations largest seller.

The aim is to reflect actuarial realities – women live longer and prepare ahead more for their futures by buying policies. Genworth says two-thirds of it’s LTCI claim payouts go to female customers, and overall, women account for 57 percent of all policy sales in 2011, according to data from LIMRA, the insurance research and consulting group.

Genworth will introduce gender-specified policy pricing by this spring, if the plan passes regulatory hurdles. That will boost the cost of new policies for women by 20 to 40 percent, depending on the applicant’s age and benefit package, according to the American Association for Long Term care Insurance (AALTCI).

Industry experts expect gender-based pricing will be adopted by other carriers before the end of this year – both for individuals and married couples.

Gender-based pricing is the latest stopgap measure for an industry that already is struggling. The ultra-low interest rate environment has made it difficult for the insurance companies to earn enough on their fixed income portfolios to fund benefits.

Another challenge for insurance companies, ironically, is customer loyalty. Only about 3 percent of policyholders allow their coverage to lapse. It’s a smart consumer move to hold onto policies, but it is costly for carriers, who ultimately wind up paying more claims.

Also, the stressed Medicaid system is the nation’s largest insurer, which puts stress on federal and state budgets. Outside of that, family members are the most common source of care.

So, what can women do to get the lowest rates possible in this new environment?

1. Get Started Now – If you have been thinking of buying Long Term care insurance, this would be a great time to get going. Genworth is applying now for gender-based rate increases to individual state insurance regulators.
2. Apply As A Couple – If you are married, applying as a couple will keep your cost down. Genworth and the rest of the industry apply discounts for couples who apply for coverage together.
3. Ask Questions – To find out more information about this article and to get informed on Long Term Care basics, give me a call.

Abe Glickman, LTCA, LTCP
Member: AALTCI, NAHU, NAIFA, SOA
Abe Glickman Insurance Group
Toll-Free Phone: 877-298-5824
Email: AG@AbeGlickman.com

“It is better to create a plan 10 years too soon than one day too late.”

Questions or Comments? Give me a call!


Breaking Down The Long Term Care Claim In Numbers

Breaking Down the Long Term Care Claim In Numbers

Now that Long Term Care Insurance has been around for a while, sufficient data has been accumulated so that we have a good grasp on claims. The industry is paying a very large amount of dollars in claims – some $6.6 billion in benefits was paid to about 200,000 individuals in 2011 – all of you should be aware of this information.

Here is an analysis of the more than 160,000 claims that a leading carrier paid by the end of 2011.

In Dollars
• $1.2 million is the largest single claim
• 50% of all claim dollars are paid to claimants with mental disorders including dementia

Benefit Recipients
• 78.7 is the average age of claimants. At age 80, it’s approximately 26% of claims, age 85 it’s about 24% of claims and age 90 it’s 9%
• Youngest claimant is 28; oldest is 103
• 71% of claims have been paid to female claimants
• Married women tend to claim at an earlier age than single women and men

Length of Claims
• 43% of claims last less than one years due to short recoverable illness, a sudden terminal illness or a single use of non-caregiving benefits
• The average length of claims that last more than a year is 4-9 years
• 35% of claims will last more than five years
• Of 100 people, 80 do not transition from where they receive their initial care.

Who Goes On Claim And For What – By Gender And Cause
• Single Women – 38% of all claims
• Married Women – 27% of all claims
• Single Men – 11% of all claims
• Married Men – 24% of all claims
• Women – Dementia, Cancer, Fractures, Stroke
• Men – Dementia, Cancer, Stroke, Parkinson’s

Of all the claims, 59% died while on claims, 30% recovered and 11% exhausted their benefits.

(Source – *AALTCI Source Book)

Abe Glickman, LTCA, LTCP
Member: AALTCI, NAHU, NAIFA, SOA
Abe Glickman Insurance Group
Toll-Free Phone: 877-298-5824
Email: AG@AbeGlickman.com

“It is better to create a plan 10 years too soon than one day too late.”

Questions or Comments? Give me a call!


It’s Expensive

Would you buy Long Term Care insurance?

“People say the premiums are expensive.” As a Long Term Care insurance Agent, I hear this all the time.
Are they??

I have to expand the question for those who make that statement.

Long Term Care insurance premiums are expensive compared to…what? Compared to the cost of Long Term Care? NO. Long Term Care insurance premiums are a drop in the bucket compared to the cost of the type of care this valuable insurance pays for.

Here’s an example:

A 50-year-old can get a $200 daily benefit to cover today’s cost of care with either a 3-year benefit period or a 5-year benefit period for only $159.14 a month or $224.26 a month respectively. If a spouse is also issued, the premium is reduced 10% for both and paying annually instead of monthly will reduce it an additional 8%. So now were at $1,591 for the 3-years benefit period and $2,242 for the 5-year benefit period.

Sound like a lot? Here’s the value proposition: The premium for the 3-year plan will cost $47,730 over 30 years and the premium for the 5-year plan will cost $67,260. At 5% compound, the daily benefit will be $823.23 in 30 years, which means the benefit pool for the 3-year plan will be $901,433 and the benefit for the 5-year plan will be $1,577,508.

Let me restate this information to be crystal clear:

Buying Long Term Care insurance at the above premium means you would spend 4% to 5% of the potential benefits in 30 years ($47,730 is 5% of $901,433 and $67,260 is 4$ of $1.5 million).

But…were not done yet:

The benefits will continue to grow each year at 5% compound for the rest of your life as long as you haven’t used them all up! At 5% compound, the benefits DOUBLE every 14 years.

I’ve told you what the benefits will be at age 80 for the 50-year-old. Could today’s 50-year-old live to be age 95? According to the Wall Street Journal, one in 10 people who turned age 65 in 2011 will see age 95, so it’s logical to think those odds will be even higher for someone 15 years younger.

At age 95, the 3-year plan will have grown to almost $2 million and the 5-year plan will be sitting at $3 million.
$1,591 x 45 Years = $71,595 Premium vs. $1.8 million in potential Benefits
$2,242 x 45 Years = $100,890 in Premium vs. $3.1 million in potential Benefits

Oh, and let’s see, should I mention that the premium STOPS once you start using the benefits?

But wait – I’m not saying that the premiums can’t increase on a class basis…because yes, they certainly can.

What if you never use it? You’ve made a 4% to 5% mistake…but was it a mistake? Your 4% to 5% mistake bought a peace of mind for you and your family for 30 to 45 years. To me, that’s priceless.

Abe Glickman, LTCA, LTCP
Member: AALTCI, NAHU, NAIFA, SOA
Abe Glickman Insurance Group
Toll-Free Phone: 877-298-5824
Email: AG@AbeGlickman.com

“It is better to create a plan 10 years too soon than one day too late.”

Questions or Comments? Give me a call!


It’s Expensive

Would you buy Long Term Care insurance?

“People say the premiums are expensive.” As a Long Term Care insurance Agent, I hear this all the time.

Are they??

I have to expand the question for those who make that statement.

Long Term Care insurance premiums are expensive compared to…what? Compared to the cost of Long Term Care? NO. Long Term Care insurance premiums are a drop in the bucket compared to the cost of the type of care this valuable insurance pays for.

Here’s an example:

A 50-year-old can get a $200 daily benefit to cover today’s cost of care with either a 3-year benefit period or a 5-year benefit period for only $159.14 a month or $224.26 a month respectively. If a spouse is also issued, the premium is reduced 10% for both and paying annually instead of monthly will reduce it an additional 8%. So now were at $1,591 for the 3-years benefit period and $2,242 for the 5-year benefit period.

Sound like a lot? Here’s the value proposition: The premium for the 3-year plan will cost $47,730 over 30 years and the premium for the 5-year plan will cost $67,260. At 5% compound, the daily benefit will be $823.23 in 30 years, which means the benefit pool for the 3-year plan will be $901,433 and the benefit for the 5-year plan will be $1,577,508.

Let me restate this information to be crystal clear:
Buying Long Term Care insurance at the above premium means you would spend 4% to 5% of the potential benefits in 30 years ($47,730 is 5% of $901,433 and $67,260 is 4$ of $1.5 million).

But…were not done yet:

The benefits will continue to grow each year at 5% compound for the rest of your life as long as you haven’t used them all up! At 5% compound, the benefits DOUBLE every 14 years.

I’ve told you what the benefits will be at age 80 for the 50-year-old. Could today’s 50-year-old live to be age 95? According to the Wall Street Journal, one in 10 people who turned age 65 in 2011 will see age 95, so it’s logical to think those odds will be even higher for someone 15 years younger.

At age 95, the 3-year plan will have grown to almost $2 million and the 5-year plan will be sitting at $3 million.

$1,591 x 45 Years = $71,595 Premium vs. $1.8 million in potential Benefits
$2,242 x 45 Years = $100,890 in Premium vs. $3.1 million in potential Benefits

Oh, and let’s see, should I mention that the premium STOPS once you start using the benefits?

But wait – I’m not saying that the premiums can’t increase on a class basis…because yes, they certainly can.

What if you never use it? You’ve made a 4% to 5% mistake…but was it a mistake? Your 4% to 5% mistake bought a peace of mind for you and your family for 30 to 45 years. To me, that’s priceless.

Abe Glickman, LTCA, LTCP
Member: AALTCI, NAHU, NAIFA, SOA
Abe Glickman Insurance Group
Toll-Free Phone: 877-298-5824
Email: AG@AbeGlickman.com

“It is better to create a plan 10 years too soon than one day too late.”

Questions or Comments? Give me a call!


What is the Cost of Long Term Care ?

Long Term Care services can be expensive, and costs vary widely based on where you will be receiving care.

National rates are as follows*:

•The average daily rate for a private room in a nursing home is $203, or $74,095 a year
•The average daily rate for a semi-private room in a nursing home is $176, or $64,240 a year
•The average monthly rate for assisted living facility is $3,061, or $36,372 per year
•The average hourly rate for a home health aid is $19, or a 10 hour day for $190
These costs are expected to DOUBLE in 20 years!!

“An American at age 65 has an average life expectancy of 18.7 more years.”

How will I Pay for Long Term Care Services?

You can pay for these services a number of different ways:

•Pay out of your own pocket and deplete a lifetime of savings
•Apply for Medicaid, but you will be required to spend down your assets and “become a ward of the state”
•Purchase a Long Term Care Insurance Policy